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Vodka Mixology with Barbury Hill

It’s Friday. It’s the end of another week. Sure, you could pour yourself a Sir Ranulph Fiennes’ rum and coke, or a sparkling G&T with River Test’s award-winning gin. You could even add a dash of Bitter Union’s Spiced Orange Bitters. But if there’s one thing many of us have a bit more of these days, it’s time. So why not take that time and put it to good use; and no, we’re not talking about learning to crochet or make banana bread. With just a few ingredients, a dash of imagination here and a splash of pizzazz there, we can all channel our inner James Bond and make an aperitif to lift our Friday evening.

As the basis of a cocktail, vodka steps up and shows its versatility. As a morning pick-me-up in a Bloody Mary or the pep-talk in a glass Espresso Martini, few spirits can so easily be transformed. With Barbury Hill’s offerings of Black Cow Vodka and Gattertop’s Damson No.12 and Botanic No.7, your evening tipple will be far from run-of-the-mill.

Damson No.12 Negroni (Serves two)
Damson No.12 Negroni

While our physical travels are currently curtailed, there’s nothing to stop us dreaming. At Barbury Hill we’ve discovered the sheer magic to be found in food and drink as a way of sparking memories of past travels and imaginings of journeys to come. The clink of ice in a cocktail shaker and euphoric colour of a Negroni sends us back to Italy quicker than any flight. If you’re taking things a little easier, Wilfred’s Orange and Rosemary Spritz has the same effect, but with zero-alcohol and low calories.

  • 25ml of Gattertop Damson No.12
  • 25ml Dry Gin (we’d recommend River Test or Salcombe Gin)
  • 10ml Campari
  • 35ml Vermouth

Add all the ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice and shake up a storm before straining into a glass with fresh ice. Garnish with a slice of orange or a delicate strip of peel.

Dorset Donkey

Dorset Donkey with Black Cow Vodka

If your evening needs a little kick, we’d suggest a Dorset Donkey. Made with the super smooth Black Cow Vodka, this one’s a real prizewinner.

  • 50ml Black Cow Vodka
  • 10ml morello cherry liqueur
  • 20ml lime juice
  • 3 sprigs of sage
  • blueberries
  • Ginger ale


Pop a few blueberries into a highball glass with two sprigs of sage. Gently press the sage and berries together before adding the vodka, morello cherry liqueur and lime juice. Fill the glass with ice and top with ginger ale before muddling the berry mixture through the drink. A sprig of sage and a blueberry or two are the perfect garnish for this intriguing yet elegant drink.

 

Espresso Martini

Espresso Martini with Black Cow Vodka

It’s getting late. The conversation is starting to slow. Time for a quick caffeine hit with an Espresso Martini. 

  • 50ml Black Cow Vodka
  • 40ml fresh, cooled coffee
  • 15ml maple syrup

Add all the ingredients to a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously (if the coffee doesn’t wake you up, this will) and strain into a martini glass. Garnish with a couple of coffee beans.

Botanic No.7 ‘Morning After’ Bloody Mary

Bloody Mary with Gattertop's Botanic No.7 Vodka

With such a tempting selection of libations, there’s a danger of over-indulgence. Luckily, Gattertop is on hand to ease us into the day with their take on a Bloody Mary. 

  • 50ml Gattertop Botanic No.7
  • Turner Hardy Tomato Juice Mixers
  • Lemon and a sprig of dill

Combine the Botanic No.7 with your chosen mixer and plenty of ice before topping with a slice of lemon and a sprig of dill. Add a dash of Tabasco for an extra kick.

 

We may not be able to host family and friends just yet, but there’s nothing to stop us practising our mixology skills in preparation. Add a bottle of Black Cow Vodka, Gattertop Botanic No.7 or Damson No. 12 to your Barbury Hill basket to ensure you’re ready to shake things up this summer.

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Rebecca, Copywriter

 by Rebecca Lancaster, Copywriter

Rebecca, a talented writer, is a friend of Barbury Hill’s. When she’s not eating the best of British food and drink, she is writing about it. And when she’s not writing about it, she’s thinking about it.

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